Tag Archives: san angelo texas

Cathedral happenings

A number of new things and events will begin tomorrow, Monday, July 8, at the Cathedral:

We will begin to offer coffee and a muffin to those who attend the 8:30 a.m. weekday Masses. Come on out and pray for your coffee!

The parish will begin a sack lunch ministry to the homeless and needy and hungry in the downtown area. We will distribute the lunches from the kitchen door in the back of the school building from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. If you are interested in helping out in this ministry, please call the Cathedral Offices at 325-658-6567.

And, last but not least, the Cathedral Parish will begin to offer ZUMBA on Monday evenings from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the gym. There is no charge, but donations will be welcomed. Come on out, have fun and get healthy. Everyone is invited and welcome!

The Concho Padre

Pope tells nuncios to help him find new bishops who are meek and merciful

Pope Francis met with all the Papal Nuncios (Vatican Ambassadors who are all archbishops) on Thursday. Here is a report from Catholic News Service

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Timothy Cardinal Dolan

Here is an article on the Fortnight for Freedom by His Eminence, Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York:

Standing in New York Harbor, the Statue of Liberty is one of our most beloved landmarks, both as New Yorkers and as Americans. So many of our ancestors fondly recalled seeing Lady Liberty, their first vision of a new homeland. Many of them told the story of seeing her for the first time, and not a few of them had to pause in retelling it because of a lump in their throat or a tear in their eye.

Even those of us who were born in America cherish the Statue of Liberty, and, even more importantly, what it stands for. Who indeed can fail to be moved by the line from Emma Lazarus’ famous poem:

“Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free”

That atmosphere of liberty is so much a part of the American experience and heritage. Of course, most of us did not have to travel far and suffer hardship to glimpse the torch of the Statue, and to embrace her promise of freedom. Most newcomers today do not come by ship, and so never set eyes upon her. We New Yorkers, frequently in a rush to our next destination, don’t even look out into the Harbor very often.

So it would be easy for us to take the Statue of Liberty for granted, as just another landmark for tourists to visit. And it would be all too easy to forget how precious — and fragile — is that breath of freedom that our forerunners yearned for so ardently. This desire for freedom was written into the human heart by God, and exalted in God’s word in the Bible. It is expressed so powerfully in the founding documents of our nation, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. It is the ideal to which all our national institutions aspire, and which they are bound to protect and respect. It is for freedom that so many of our brothers and sisters have been willing to sacrifice their lives to defend.

I don’t wish to push this analogy too far, but in recent years it has become a bit more difficult to “breathe free” as deeply as we would like. The atmosphere is not quite so clear and mild any more. Our liberty — like clean air — isn’t something we can take for granted.

This is the reason that the Bishops of the United States have called upon all Catholics, and all people of good will, to spend the days from June 21 through July 4 as a Fortnight for Freedom. These fourteen days are designed to raise awareness and to encourage action on a number of the current challenges to religious liberty. These include:
The HHS mandate, which presumes to intrude upon the very definition of faith and ministry, and could cause believers to violate their consciences.

Impending Supreme Court rulings that could redefine marriage, which will present a host of difficulties to institutions and people who stand on their faith-based understanding of authentic marriage as between one man and one woman

Proposed legislation at the national and state levels that would expand abortion rights, legalize assisted suicide, restrict immigrants from full participation in society, and limit the ability of Church agencies to provide humanitarian services.

Government intrusion into the rights and duties of parents regarding their children.

Overt persecution of believers in many countries of the world.

My brother bishops and I are encouraging people to offer prayers to God, the source of our freedom, that we may fully enjoy the liberty that was sought by those who came to our shores. We are also urging practical action to defend our freedom.

Our two weeks begin tomorrow, June 21, and include moving feasts, such as June 22, the feast of Saint Thomas More and Saint John Fisher, both martyrs in England as they prophetically defended the rights of the Church against intrusion by the crown; June 24, the Birth of Saint John the Baptist, the one who defended God’s law to a tyrant and lost his head because of his courage; and, of course, Independence Day.

We must never forget the power of the American promise, which was passed on to us by our ancestors, and which we hold in trust for generations to come.

And, like Lady Liberty, may we always be proud to lift high the torch of freedom and hope to those who yearn for it today.

The Concho Padre

Pope Francis Thursday Mass

To pray the Our Father we have to have a heart at peace with our brothers. We don’t pray “my Father,” but “our Father,” because “we are not an only child, none of us are”. This was the focus of Pope Francis’ homily at Mass Thursday morning in Casa Santa Marta. The Pope emphasized that we believe in a God who is a Father, who is “very close” to us, who is not anonymous, not “a cosmic God.” Read more

Monday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time

Lord God,
king of heaven and earth,
direct our minds and bodies throughout this day,
and make us holy.
Keep us faithful to your law in thought, word and deed.
Be our helper now and always,
free us from sin,
and bring us to salvation in that kingdom
where you live and reign with the Father and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
– Amen.

Pope’s homily at Gospel of Life Mass

This morning in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis celebrated Mass for a crowd estimated in excess of 200,000 people. The occasion was the “Gospel of Life” Mass, part of the celebrations of the Year of Faith. Read the pope’s full homily in this report from Vatican Radio.

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Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

O God,
strength of those who hope in you,
graciously hear our pleas, and,
since without you mortal frailty can do nothing,
grant us always the help of your grace,
that in following your commands we may please you
by our resolve and our deeds.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
– Amen.

Gospel – Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

Gospel Lk 7:36—8:3

A Pharisee invited Jesus to dine with him,
and he entered the Pharisee’s house and reclined at table.
Now there was a sinful woman in the city
who learned that he was at table in the house of the Pharisee.
Bringing an alabaster flask of ointment,
she stood behind him at his feet weeping
and began to bathe his feet with her tears.
Then she wiped them with her hair,
kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment.
When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this he said to himself,
“If this man were a prophet,
he would know who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him,
that she is a sinner.”
Jesus said to him in reply,
“Simon, I have something to say to you.”
“Tell me, teacher, ” he said.
“Two people were in debt to a certain creditor;
one owed five hundred days’ wages and the other owed fifty.
Since they were unable to repay the debt, he forgave it for both.
Which of them will love him more?”
Simon said in reply,
“The one, I suppose, whose larger debt was forgiven.”
He said to him, “You have judged rightly.”

Then he turned to the woman and said to Simon,
“Do you see this woman?
When I entered your house, you did not give me water for my feet,
but she has bathed them with her tears
and wiped them with her hair.
You did not give me a kiss,
but she has not ceased kissing my feet since the time I entered.
You did not anoint my head with oil,
but she anointed my feet with ointment.
So I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven
because she has shown great love.
But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little.”
He said to her, “Your sins are forgiven.”
The others at table said to themselves,
“Who is this who even forgives sins?”
But he said to the woman,
“Your faith has saved you; go in peace.”

Afterward he journeyed from one town and village to another,
preaching and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God.
Accompanying him were the Twelve
and some women who had been cured of evil spirits and infirmities,
Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out,
Joanna, the wife of Herod’s steward Chuza,
Susanna, and many others who provided for them
out of their resources.

News Briefs, June 14

Catholic News Service is the official news agency of the US Conference of Catholic Bishops. They publish a daily News Briefs. Read more.

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News Briefs, June 13

Catholic News Service is the official news agency of the US Conference of Catholic Bishops. Here are their News Briefs for today.

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