Tag Archives: readings

Monday of the First Week of Advent

Monday’s Readings from USCCB

Collect:
Keep us alert, we pray, O Lord our God,
as we await the advent of Christ your Son,
so that when he comes and knocks
he may find us watchful in prayer and exultant in his praise.
Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. *

Today’s Readings

Daily Meditation:
That He may instruct us in His ways.
Come, let us walk in the light of the Lord!

We want to begin this journey by rallying ourselves
to turn to the Lord with great hope.
In the midst of many discouraging challenges in our lives
and the violence in the world around us,
we desire to spend this day in anticipation of the graces
our God desires to give us.

They shall beat their swords into plowshares
and their spears into pruning hooks;
one nation shall not raise the sword against another,
nor shall they train for war again. Is. 2

Lord, I am not worthy to receive you;
but say only the word and my soul will be healed.

Today’s Daily Reflection

Intercessions:
Christ the Lord, Son of the living God, light from light,
leads us into the light and reveals his holiness.
With confidence, let us make our prayer:
Come, Lord Jesus!

Light that never fades, dispel the mists about us,
– awaken our faith from sleep.

Guard us from all harm today,
– may your glory fill us with joy.

Give us unfailing gentleness at all times,
– toward everyone we meet.

Come to create a new earth for us,
– where there will be justice and peace.

Closing Prayer:
Loving God,
I sense that all is your creation
and everything, and all of us,
are being drawn back toward your loving heart.

Help me to be a person of peace,
to speak about it in an uneasy world,
and to live it among the people
you have put into my life every day.

Light in me a desire to prepare for your coming
to stand in the darkness, waiting, eager and filled with joy.

From Creighton University

Reflections for the Mass Readings for Tuesday

Read today’s readings from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Everything that’s built by human beings can be destroyed. That’s why something like the Great Pyramids of Egypt are so awesome: not simply because they are so colossal, but because they have—to an amazing extent—survived the ravages of time. You can think of one of the large cities on the West Coast of our own country (Los Angeles, for example): from the air, as you fly into the area, you can be filled with awe. And yet an earthquake could destroy everything in the area in a matter of minutes.

Through the prophet Daniel, God wanted King Nebuchadnezzar to know that his kingdom, so dear to him, could and would undergo destruction. Other kingdoms would take its place, but they, too, would last only a time. The prophecy of Daniel foreshadowed the words of Jesus, when he spoke of the Temple of Jerusalem: it, like everything built by human beings, will be destroyed. These are not the sorts of things to place our hope in.

Daniel also prophesied that God would set up a kingdom that would not be destroyed. There was no way that Daniel could understand this prophecy, but through Daniel, God was speaking about the Church: not church buildings (even Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome will someday fall), but the Church herself, made up of “living stones”. Those who place their faith in Christ the King will have eternal life.

The Catholic Diocese of Wichita

Commentary on Scripture for Wednesday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time

Click here to see today’s readings.

“You have hidden these things from the wise and the learned and have revealed them to the childlike”

My daughters, if only you knew the delight God takes in seeing a poor village girl, a poor [religious] Daughter of Charity speak to him lovingly, oh!, you would walk with even greater confidence than I could advise you. If you knew how much science you would draw from it, how much love and sweetness you would find in it! There you would find it all, dear daughters, because it is the fountain and spring of all knowledge.

Where does it come from that you see unlettered people speak so fluently about God and explain mysteries with more understanding that would a doctor? A doctor who has no more than his doctrine really speaks about God according to the manner his knowledge has taught him; but a prayerful person speaks in an altogether different way. And the difference between them comes, my daughters, from the fact that the first speaks out of a knowledge that is simply acquired, but the other from an infused knowledge full of love, in such a way that the doctor in this comparison is by no means the more knowledgeable. And he is obliged to keep quiet wherever a person of prayer is present because she speaks of God in a very different way than he is able to do.

Saint Vincent de Paul

Thoughts on the readings for Friday of the 14th Week in Ordinary Time

Today’s Readings

Imagine what was going through the minds of the Twelve. Jesus calls them to leave their work to follow Him. Then He gives them their job description (yesterday) – they were to cure the sick, raise the dead to life and drive out demons. They probably thought, “How can we do this?”

Now in today’s Gospel, Jesus tells them, “I am sending you like sheep among wolves.” You will be scourged, hated and persecuted.

Now, I don’t know about you, but I think I would be ready to run at that moment. I am being called from what I know and from my comfort zone. I am being asked to do things that seem humanly impossible. Now I’m being told that this will lead to persecution.

Why would these men continue on the mission? It was because they had met the person of Jesus, the Messiah, God-with-us. He was worth leaving everything behind. He was worth being scourged, hated and persecuted. He was worth dying for.

(Taken from somewhere on the net, but I can’t remember where!)